33 N. Dearborn Street, Suite 1130, Chicago, IL 60602

5 Convenient Locations

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Youtube
Search

NO FEE OR COSTS UNLESS WE WIN!

call us312-999-0999fax312-999-8999

Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Illinois disability lawyer

IL disabiity lawyerThere are a variety of conditions that can cause a person to become disabled, and some of them may be less obvious than others. While injuries or physical impairments can affect the type of work a person can perform, mental health concerns can also lead to disability. Unfortunately, those who suffer from mental illness may be denied Social Security Disability benefits, and they should understand their options for appealing these decisions.

Magistrate Overrules ALJ’s Decision Due to Incorrect Consideration of Mental Limitations

One recent Illinois case illustrates some of the reasons a person with a mental illness may be improperly denied disability benefits. In the case of Panayiota P. K. v. Commissioner of Social Security, the plaintiff was a 49-year-old woman who suffered from multiple mental impairments, including bipolar disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). She reported difficulty with concentration, understanding and following instructions, and getting along with authority figures. She also experienced anxiety attacks multiple times per week, anger issues, and a voice in her head that told her to strike people who upset her.

At the plaintiff’s evidentiary hearing, the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) determined that the plaintiff had the residual functional capacity (RFC) to perform work involving simple, routine tasks. A vocational expert (VE) testified that the plaintiff could work in light jobs such as a cleaner or production worker, but they noted that being off-task for at least 10% of the time would result in termination, and the plaintiff would likely also be terminated if she had any verbal or physical confrontations while at work. The ALJ denied disability benefits and stated that the plaintiff should be able to find work within her limitations.

...

IL disability lawyerIn Social Security disability cases filed before March 27, 2017, agency officials are normally required to give “controlling weight” to the medical opinions of your treating physicians when assessing your claim for benefits. A Social Security administrative law judge (ALJ) may only depart from this controlling-weight rule by giving specific reasons, based on the available medical evidence, why the treating physician's views are contradicted by other evidence or are someone internally inconsistent.

Judge Rules ALJ Failed to Properly Follow Pre-2017 Regulations

Even though the pre-2017 rule is well understood, it is not always correctly applied. Take this recent decision from an Illinois federal judge, Rosalinda G. v. Saul. In this case, the judge ordered Social Security to conduct a new disability hearing after finding the ALJ failed to properly follow the treating-source rule.

The plaintiff here applied for disability in 2013 based primarily on her fibromyalgia. Three of the plaintiff's treating physicians presented medical evidence for her disability hearing. The ALJ assigned to the case ultimately gave “little weight” to the views of two of these doctors, and only assigned “great weight” to “aspects” of the third doctor's opinions. As you might expect, the ALJ found the plaintiff did not qualify as disabled and denied her application for benefits.

...

IL disability lawyerWhen a federal court determines Social Security has failed to properly weigh medical evidence in a disability case, the normal course of action is to remand–return–the case to the agency for a new hearing. But what happens when Social Security ignores the court's instructions? Indeed, what happens when the same disability case is brought to court multiple times?

Magistrate: ALJ Ignored Disability Applicant's Pain During Hearing

This scenario recently played out before an Illinois federal magistrate judge. This particular case, Kimberly M. v. Saul, involves a woman who has not worked in nearly 15 years. The plaintiff is in her mid-50s and stopped working in 2005 due to ongoing complications from a back injury. Despite surgery in 2016, the plaintiff continues to experience “significant pain in her spine, right hip, buttock and leg,” according to the magistrate's opinion.

Unfortunately, the plaintiff's difficulties with the disability insurance system have proved just as persistent as her back pain. By the time of the magistrate's order in April 2020, the plaintiff had been through three separate hearings at Social Security. Each time, an administrative law judge (ALJ) determined the plaintiff did not meet the legal requirements for disability benefits. And each time, the court found Social Security ignored key medical evidence.

...

You are not alone. Call now for a FREE consultation 312-999-0999

Unable to travel to my office? No problem! No office visit required.

dupage county bar association Chicago abr association nosscr Super Lawyer
Back to Top