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IL SSDI lawyerLife can be difficult for many people who have disabilities. One of the ways the government helps those people is by providing financial assistance through the Social Security Administration (SSA). There are two programs that the SSA runs, Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI). Both programs get thousands of applications each year, but not everyone is approved. In some cases, the information provided at the time they applied was either incorrect or not sufficient to allow them to begin collecting benefits. When applying for either program, it is important that you have all of the required information organized and prepared.

Personal Information

First, the SSA will want to know all of your personal information. This would include things like your name, social security number, and place of birth. If you have ever been in the military, they want to know what branch you were in and your dates of enlistment and discharge. They will also want to know whether or not you have a spouse or any children. If you do, they will want their identifying information, including their date of birth and social security numbers. If you were married and/or divorced, you should know the dates of those events.

Information About Your Medical Condition

Next, the SSA will want to know about your medical condition that causes you to be disabled. They will ask you to provide the name and contact information of someone who is familiar with your disability that they can contact if you need assistance with your claim. They will also ask you to list all of your medical conditions, injuries, and illnesses that prevent you from working. You must also provide the contact information for any physicians, hospitals, and/or clinics and the date of service for any medical treatment you have received. You should also provide information about any medications you may be taking and any medical tests you have had done.

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IL disability lawyerThere are multiple different types of conditions that can affect a person’s ability to work and earn an income. Fortunately, Social Security disability benefits can provide much-needed financial assistance in these cases. However, disability claims may be denied for a variety of different reasons. When appealing a denial of disability benefits, a person’s case will be reviewed by an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ). The ALJ may consider multiple different forms of evidence when determining whether a person is disabled, and one issue that they may consider is whether the daily activities a person performs demonstrate that they are or are not disabled.

Magistrate Overturns ALJ’s Decision Based on Improper Consideration of Subjective Symptoms

A recent decision in Illinois courts illustrates the role that a person’s daily activities may play in an ALJ’s determination of whether a person is disabled. In the case of Steven L. v. Saul, the plaintiff was a 49-year-old man who suffered from chronic liver disease, asthma, neuropathy, and affective disorder. While the ALJ found that the plaintiff’s impairments made him incapable of resuming his past work as a neurologist, she ruled that he could work in jobs where he was limited to light work and simple, routine tasks.

The ALJ’s decision was based in part on the plaintiff’s ability to participate in daily activities, specifically noting that the plaintiff stated that he regularly engaged in driving, using a computer, and caring for his children. The ALJ determined that the plaintiff’s ability to participate in these types of activities undermined his claims that he suffered limitations that affected his ability to find or maintain employment.

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IL disability attorneyFor those who have suffered an injury, illness, or another type of physical or mental condition that has affected their ability to work, Social Security disability benefits can be crucial for ensuring that they can meet their ongoing needs. To receive Social Security disability, a person will need to show that they have experienced impairments that have affected their ability to work and earn an income. In many cases, disability benefits will be denied, but these denials must be based on valid evidence, including medical records and testimony from medical experts and vocational experts. In these cases, applicants may be unsure about their options, especially if their claims are based primarily on their own testimony regarding their condition rather than relying on medical evidence.

Magistrate Reverses Denial of Benefits Based on an Improper Consideration of Plaintiff’s Testimony

Ideally, disability applicants will want to have as much evidence as possible to show that they are disabled. However, in cases where there is a lack of medical evidence, certain procedures should be followed to obtain and explore the relevant facts of the case. This was illustrated in a recent Illinois case, Jennifer L. K. v. Commissioner of Social Security.

The plaintiff in this case was a 56-year-old woman who had sustained an injury to both of her thumbs after falling on ice. She suffered from arthritis and received a surgical procedure, after which she struggled with moving her hands and fingers and grasping objects. At an evidentiary hearing, an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) determined that the plaintiff could perform her past relevant work as an eyewear salesperson while being limited to frequent “handling and fingering.”

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